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Village History

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For many centuries Chipperfield was an outlying settlement of the village of Kings Langley, being on the boundary of the domain of the Royal Palace there. The first documentary evidence of the name is found in 1316, when Edward II bequeathed ‘the Manor House of Langley the closes adjoining together with the vesture of Chepervillewode for Fewel and other Necessaries’ to the Dominican Black Friars. The name is probably derived from the Anglo-Saxon ‘ceapere’ –a trader and ‘feld’ meaning field, suggesting that there was some form of market in early times

By the 1830’s the hamlet was large enough to warrant the building of both Anglican and Baptist Churches and Chipperfield became a separate ecclesiastical parish in 1848. The first council housing was built after the First World War. Later in the economic slump some farmland was sold for small holdings and commuter homes along the access roads to the village and the local lanes.
Since the Second World War the village has expanded considerably, the majority of the new building being in the form of local authority housing. Some manorial land was given for council housing in the late 1940’s and a considerably larger area was acquired from a local nurseryman for an extensive council estate to the east of Croft Lane in the 1960’s. In 1963 Chipperfield was split off from Kings Langley and Chipperfield Parish Council created. Since 1980 the rate of new building has diminished considerably, though a noteworthy addition in 1986 was the building of a Roman Catholic church to serve Chipperfield and the surrounding villages.

As part of the Manor of Kings Langley, Chipperfield Common was in royal ownership from 1066 when William I conquered England until 1630 when Charles I sold it to the City of London to pay his debts. For four hundred years the Manor was a favourite royal palace and park but since 1630 ownership has changed several times, either by inheritance or by purchase. In 1936 Chipperfield Common, which at that time comprised pasture, heathland and woods, was gifted to the local authority by the Lord of the Manor.

A Guide to Old Hertfordshire – Chipperfield at the Hertfordshire Genealogy website.

This page is edited by Russ

8 CommentsRSS

Nigel

Hi Sharon,

I remember a Larry Brownsell who used to have a small holding in Kings Langley at the end of Waterside opposite what used to be The Lamb public house but not much about him, maybe related.

November 10, 2016
Stephen MORRILL

Sharon’s comment on May 3 2016 – Sharon, yes, there are still Brownsells locally. They live in Deadmans Ash Lane in Sarratt, a couple of miles away and could well be part of your extended family. They are tree surgeons and do a lot of work in the locality. I know both the father (Charlie) and his (adult) son and can pass on your contact details if you wish.
Photos – there are not very many in existence, and they tend to be of groups of people at village events. Most likely occupation for your ancestors was farming or similar work which employed a lot of the village. Stephen Morrill.

June 22, 2016
keith stevens

anyone remember the scott family that lived at 54 tower hill 40s 50s and 60s …my granddad jim and gran Sylvia both buried in the church cemetery they had two sons jim and ray and two daughters Brenda and pam

June 16, 2016
keith stevens

anyone remember the scott family that lived at 54 tower hill ..my granddad was jim scott and my gran Sylvia they had two sons Raymond and jim and two daughters Brenda and Pamela ,,lived there 40s 50s and 60s

June 16, 2016
Sharon

My ancestors all came from Chipperfield since 1730 there sir name was Brownsell, i am resurching my family tree , But i just dont know anything about what type of life they lived,and photos of Chipperfield, Kings Langly in them days…I wander if you could just help me please…and also I just wondered if there are any Brownsell family still in the area
Kind Regards
Sharon

May 3, 2016
John Puzey

Hello
In 1942 my mother recived a letter from a Gladys Gough of Windrush, Wayside, Chipperfield. The letter told my mother that Mrs Gough had heard on the Vactican Radio that my father, who had been posted missing, was alive and a POW.

Does anyone know about, or perhaps even remember Mrs Gough?

Thanks

January 25, 2015
Mary Field

My ancestors all came from Chipperfield since 1769, that’s as far back as I have searched. I have visited the area and found it absolutely beautiful with the large village green. I just wondered if there are any Field or Curl family still in the area or in the region of Bucks Hill.

September 19, 2013
geoffrey e. dixon-hamilton

Hi, W 15. vi. 2011 – 13.58
thanks for such in interesting pottage of Chipperfield village.
I lived at ‘Ainsworth Farm’ Bucks Hill, and played on this
village common as a schoolboy, 1948-9. I did summer work for
the Lord Dudley estate and Moat House Farm. I returned after
62 yrs. to the Two Brewers with my youngest son, Nicholas
where we enjoyed several good pints of ale as well as watching
the cricket played on the Common. Wehn I last visited Chipperfield
in 1949 the United States Air Force were still based in nearby Bovingdon.
I remem,ber them smoking Lucky Strike cigarettes. I was aged 8-9.
A lovely village and a splendid hostelry. Well done !! great ambience
Kindest regards
Geoff ( father ) and Nicholas Hamilton ( son )

June 15, 2011

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